things i’m thinking about

Hey guys! Here’s some beautiful flowers from Palermo, and some thoughts of mine this week.

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As always, it’s been awhile. I didn’t have time this week to whip up a recipe post – and my brain is so stuffed full of science I thought I wouldn’t bore you with whatever wisps happen to sneak out. They’re probably about plants, definitely about water, and possibly about fossils. Just good ole incoherent ramblings.

Instead, here’s some ideas for dinner, things I’ve been thinking about, and a technique I’m becoming obsessed with (hint it’s the one with eggs):

  • Here’s how to make a french omelette, aka my current obsession. I can’t even play it cool and dramatically move it to the end of the list, because all I want to do is talk about it.
    I like mixing herbs and aromatics into the eggs, and then sprinkling cheese on right before I roll it on up. My dinner omelette last night was scallions and basil in the eggs, with sharp cheddar cheese. Mmm so soothing for hearts and minds and so quick for dinner.
  • I always listen to Nicholas Kristof in the wake of horrible events. He always sets up a nice clear path: and after the Vegas shooting, this opinion piece is no exception. Let’s take some steps in the right direction, for once.
  • Helping feed Puerto Rico while eating food? Sounds pretty good to me. Can’t make it to a participating restaurant? Just donate directly to the World Central Kitchen.
  • Now that it’s getting chilly, let’s eat these tahini chocolate chip cookies warm out of the oven. Have a glass of wine with it, and impress your friends with your knowledge of how it came to taste that way. Greatest fall party trick ever.

stay sane, everybody. xo.

smart science: wine edition

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Wine has always been something that varies from person to person. My mom and I like red, my roommate likes white, and my sister adores a solid (or not so solid) prosecco or champagne. After spending a semester in Italy, I was drawn to the idea that there are guidelines and rules for producing certain kinds of wine. A lot of these rules stem around where specific varieties of grapes can be grown, and whether you can call a wine a specific name. For example – you can’t make real Chianti outside of the Chianti region, in Tuscany. Complicated stuff. It got me to thinking… I wonder how these regions, these climates, and these grape varieties all interact with each other? There has to be a reason – and onto the smart science we go!

  1. There are a couple types of climate that matter here: macroclimate, mesoclimate and microclimate. Macroclimate is the easiest – essentially just the average temperature of a place – and unsurprisingly, some grapevines are more attuned to growing in one temperature than another. Think how cacti are happier in Arizona, and how maple trees are happier up north! Same idea. Mesoclimate is a bit zoomed in – differences within a specific region – like a hill, or a riverbed. This contributes to subtle taste differences between wines grown in the same region. Finally, microclimate is studying the individual vine. This can include how much sun it gets compared to its neighbor, proximity to water, levels of wind and airflow. These can all change how good a grape is from a specific plant.
  2. Soil matters too! Just like any plant, the type of soil you grow it in will affect your final outcome. Most good wines are grown in either clay or sandy soil. Clay soil is known for producing very rich wines (think – wines from Tuscany), while sandy soil is known for producing highly aromatic wines (think – Riesling).
  3. You may have heard the word “terroir” used to describe wine. Essentially, terroir is the entire natural environment of the wine – and then how that natural environment influences the taste. Winemakers from regions where great wine has been produced for many years take this really seriously – and rightfully so.
  4. In light of all these things it takes to make a great wine, it’s no wonder that really good wine can be quite expensive. Wine forgery has actually been around almost as long as wine (classic human innovation, eh), and still constitutes a pretty big issue today. There’s a couple different ways that people forge wine – some blend wine together to try and form a final product, some simply fake the bottle, and some create a bottle to look like a fancy wine. Interestingly enough though, people tend to enjoy wine regardless of the quality if you tell them it’s more expensive. Seriously – neuroscience and brain mapping has shown heightened activity in pleasure centers. Wild, right?

To beat the wine snobs at their own game, check out the links below to learn some timely fun facts you can insert into conversation! Drink some wine while you’re at it, and I’ll be back eventually with more smart science posts on wine.

  • A general overview on everything we’ve been talking about, with a bit more detail.
  • Want to know more about wine forgery? Read this article, and then watch the documentary Sour Grapes.
  • A whirlwind five things to know about the science of wine from the World Science Festival, some of which we’ll chat about later. It’s like homework! For wine!